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Classic Album Review-Razzy Bailey “Feelin’ Right”

Recently, someone asked about Razzy Bailey and when we might review one of his works. So, today, to end the week, let’s look back at one of his releases, 1982′s “Feelin’ Right”. Released on RCA in January, it was his fourth release at RCA, and for all intents and purposes, was his last album to make any kind of impression on the Country music market, becoming his second and final top ten album, and yielding two of his final three top ten hit singles.

One of those singles opens the album, “She Left Love All Over Me”. Debuting concurrently with the album, it would climb to number one, becoming his fifth and final chart topper. Good song, nothing special, it’s pretty much the standard fare of the early 1980′s. I like it, though.

No note is made on the album cover as to where “I’ve Had My Share (Of Two-Timin’ Women)” might have been recorded. There is an audience cheering at the start and end, but not heard during the track, and the vocals and music do have a studio feel to them. I won’t say it was dubbed to sound live, but I can’t say it was actually live, either. The recording, itself, is probably the closest to pure country you’ll hear Razzy sing. A rather average recording that I can take or leave.

I do like his version of the Kenny Rogers hit, “Blaze Of Glory”. A very similar sound to Rogers’ version, Razzy’s country-blues styling works extremely well with this song. Had Kenny Rogers not already had a bit hit, I could see Razzy’s version having been a hit. One of the best tracks on the disc.

Even though the album was recorded in 1981 and released in 1982, “Travelin’ Time” still has a distinctly 1970′s Pop feel to it. Mid tempo track that’s not bad. I like the melody, in particular.

In my opinion, no one will ever be able to do the Willie Nelson written “Night Life” any better than Ray Price. That said, we have a version from Razzy Bailey. A strong brass and saxophone section on this track really adds some character to this recording. Again, Bailey’s bluesy-style of vocals works well with this track. Second-best version of this classic and a good end to side one.

Side two opens with a track titled “Bad News Look”. Another song that would have been radio-friendly in 1982, had it been a single. A song with some decent lyrics and good melody; very easy to listen to. I like this track.

Summer, 1982, and climbing the charts, eventually reaching the top ten, was the ballad, “Everytime You Cross My Mind (You Break My Heart)”. A great record that deserved a higher placing than it’s number ten peak. I’ll go so far as to say it’s one of the best Country singles of those that were on the market in the summer of ’82.

“Sittin’ Here Wishing (I Was Someplace Else)” is another song that falls into that easy to listen to category; melodic and decent lyrics. It’s not a spectacular-make you say, “Oh wow” kind of song, but it’s good. If you like Razzy, or early eighties Country music, in general, then you’ll like the track.

“I Loved ‘Em All” is bland and forgettable.

“You Momma And Daddy Sure Did Something Right” has a light, airy, slightly bouncy feel to it. Not an especially deep track, but a nice track. Lyrically, average, but I like the melody and the arrangement, which is one where the strings actually enhance, rather than muddy the overall sound. It ends the album on an upbeat feel.

Not surprisingly, this album has never seen the market as a CD or MP3 download. Used copies seemingly abound, though, with vinyl copies mostly under $10, while cassettes are going mostly around $5, that I saw.

“Everytime You Cross My Mind (You Break My Heart)” gets the Standout Track nod, while my Hidden Gem nod goes to his version of “Night Life”. Weakest Track goes to “I Loved ‘Em All”.

Overall, an album that will never be considered a classic, but it’s still a good collection of work. It has two strong hits on it, plus a couple of more tracks that could easily have been, this is an album that I find to be a quality effort, with only one really weak cut. I rate this one a 4 out of 5.

MORE EARLY ’80′s COUNTRY

Anne Murray – “Where Do You Go When You Dream”

Ricky Skaggs – “Highways And Heartaches”

Earl Thomas Conley – “Somewhere Between Right And Wrong”

“The David Frizzell And Shelly West Album”

AND MORE…

Kenny Rogers – “Love Will Turn You Around”

Michael Martin Murphey – “Michael Martin Murphey”


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